Cloudera Engineering Blog · Security Posts

Cloudera Navigator Encrypt Architecture: The Overview

Cloudera Navigator Encrypt is a key security feature in production-deployed enterprise data hubs. This post explains how it works.

Cloudera Navigator Encrypt, which is integrated with Cloudera Navigator (the native, end-to-end governance solution for Apache Hadoop-based systems), provides massively scalable, high-performance encryption for critical Hadoop data. It utilizes industry-standard AES-256 encryption and provides a transparent layer between the application and filesystem. Navigator Encrypt also includes process-based access controls, allowing authorized Hadoop processes to access encrypted data while simultaneously preventing admins or super-users like root from accessing data that they don’t need to see.

New in CDH 5.4: Sensitive Data Redaction

The best data protection strategy is to remove sensitive information from everyplace it’s not needed.

Have you ever wondered what sort of “sensitive” information might wind up in Apache Hadoop log files? For example, if you’re storing credit card numbers inside HDFS, might they ever “leak” into a log file outside of HDFS? What about SQL queries? If you have a query like select * from table where creditcard = '1234-5678-9012-3456', where is that query information ultimately stored?

How-to: Quickly Configure Kerberos for Your Apache Hadoop Cluster

Use the scripts and screenshots below to configure a Kerberized cluster in minutes.

Kerberos is the foundation of securing your Apache Hadoop cluster. With Kerberos enabled, user authentication is required. Once users are authenticated, you can use projects like Apache Sentry (incubating) for role-based access control via GRANT/REVOKE statements.

How Testing Supports Production-Ready Security in Cloudera Search

Security architecture is complex, but these testing strategies help Cloudera customers rely on production-ready results.

Among other things, good security requires user authentication and that authenticated users and services be granted access to those things (and only those things) that they’re authorized to use. Across Apache Hadoop and Apache Solr (which ships in CDH and powers Cloudera Search), authentication is accomplished using Kerberos and SPNego over HTTP and authorization is accomplished using Apache Sentry (the emerging standard for role-based fine grain access control, currently incubating at the ASF).

New in CDH 5.3: Apache Sentry Integration with HDFS

Starting in CDH 5.3, Apache Sentry integration with HDFS saves admins a lot of work by centralizing access control permissions across components that utilize HDFS.

It’s been more than a year and a half since a couple of my colleagues here at Cloudera shipped the first version of Sentry (now Apache Sentry (incubating)). This project filled a huge security gap in the Apache Hadoop ecosystem by bringing truly secure and dependable fine grained authorization to the Hadoop ecosystem and provided out-of-the-box integration for Apache Hive. Since then the project has grown significantly–adding support for Impala and Search and the wonderful Hue App to name a few significant additions.

New in CDH 5.3: Transparent Encryption in HDFS

Support for transparent, end-to-end encryption in HDFS is now available and production-ready (and shipping inside CDH 5.3 and later). Here’s how it works.

Apache Hadoop 2.6 adds support for transparent encryption to HDFS. Once configured, data read from and written to specified HDFS directories will be transparently encrypted and decrypted, without requiring any changes to user application code. This encryption is also end-to-end, meaning that data can only be encrypted and decrypted by the client. HDFS itself never handles unencrypted data or data encryption keys. All these characteristics improve security, and HDFS encryption can be an important part of an organization-wide data protection story.

Cloudera Enterprise 5.3 is Released

We’re pleased to announce the release of Cloudera Enterprise 5.3 (comprising CDH 5.3, Cloudera Manager 5.3, and Cloudera Navigator 2.2).

This release continues the drumbeat for security functionality in particular, with HDFS encryption (jointly developed with Intel under Project Rhino) now recommended for production use. This feature alone should justify upgrades for security-minded users (and an improved CDH upgrade wizard makes that process easier).

For Apache Hadoop, The POODLE Attack Has Lost Its Bite

A significant vulnerability affecting the entire Apache Hadoop ecosystem has now been patched. What was involved?

By now, you may have heard about the POODLE (Padding Oracle On Downgraded Legacy Encryption) attack on TLS (Transport Layer Security). This attack combines a cryptographic flaw in the obsolete SSLv3 protocol with the ability of an attacker to downgrade TLS connections to use that protocol. The result is that an active attacker on the same network as the victim can potentially decrypt parts of an otherwise encrypted channel. The only immediately workable fix has been to disable the SSLv3 protocol entirely.

New in CDH 5.2: Impala Authentication with LDAP and Kerberos

Impala authentication can now be handled by a combination of LDAP and Kerberos. Here’s why, and how.

Impala, the open source analytic database for Apache Hadoop, supports authentication—the act of proving you are who you say you are—using both Kerberos and LDAP. Kerberos has been supported since release 1.0, LDAP support was added more recently, and with CDH 5.2, you can use both at the same time.

New in CDH 5.2: Apache Sentry Delegated GRANT and REVOKE

This new feature, jointly developed by Cloudera and Intel engineers, makes management of role-based security much easier in Apache Hive, Impala, and Hue.

Apache Sentry (incubating) provides centralized authorization for services and applications in the Apache Hadoop ecosystem, allowing administrators to set up granular, role-based protection on resources, and to review them in one place. Previously, Sentry only designated administrators to GRANT and REVOKE privileges on an authorizable object. In Apache Sentry 1.5.0 (shipping inside CDH 5.2), we have implemented a new feature (SENTRY-327) that allows admin users to delegate the GRANT privilege to other users using WITH GRANT OPTION. If a user has the GRANT OPTION privilege on a specific resource, the user can now grant the GRANT privilege to other users on the same resource. Apache Hive, Impala, and Hue have all been updated to take advantage of this new Sentry functionality.

The Early Release Books Keep Coming: This Time, Hadoop Security

Hadoop Security is the latest book from Cloudera engineers in the Hadoop ecosystem books canon.

We are thrilled to announce the availability of the early release of Hadoop Security, a new book about security in the Apache Hadoop ecosystem published by O’Reilly Media. The early release contains two chapters on System Architecture and Securing Data Ingest and is available in O’Reilly’s catalog and in Safari Books.

Meet the Engineer: Sravya Tirukkovalur

Meet Sravya Tirukkovalur (@sravsatuluri), a Software Engineer working on Apache Hadoop security at Cloudera.

What do you do at Cloudera, and in which Apache projects are you involved?

New in Cloudera Manager 5.1: Direct Active Directory Integration for Kerberos Authentication

With this new release, setting up a separate MIT KDC for cluster authentication services is no longer necessary.

Kerberos (initially developed by MIT in the 1980s) has been adopted by every major component of the Apache Hadoop ecosystem. Consequently, Kerberos has become an integral part of the security infrastructure for the enterprise data hub (EDH).

New in CDH 5.1: Document-level Security for Cloudera Search

Cloudera Search now supports fine-grain access control via document-level security provided by Apache Sentry.

In my previous blog post, you learned about index-level security in Apache Sentry (incubating) and Cloudera Search. Although index-level security is effective when the access control requirements for documents in a collection are homogenous, often administrators want to restrict access to certain subsets of documents in a collection.

Why Extended Attributes are Coming to HDFS

Extended attributes in HDFS will facilitate at-rest encryption for Project Rhino, but they have many other uses, too.

Many mainstream Linux filesystems implement extended attributes, which let you associate metadata with a file or directory beyond common “fixed” attributes like filesize, permissions, modification dates, and so on. Extended attributes are key/value pairs in which the values are optional; generally, the key and value sizes are limited to some implementation-specific limit. A filesystem that implements extended attributes also provides system calls and shell commands to get, list, set, and remove attributes (and values) to/from a file or directory.

Project Rhino Goal: At-Rest Encryption for Apache Hadoop

An update on community efforts to bring at-rest encryption to HDFS — a major theme of Project Rhino.

Encryption is a key requirement for many privacy and security-sensitive industries, including healthcare (HIPAA regulations), card payments (PCI DSS regulations), and the US government (FISMA regulations).

This Month in the Ecosystem (May 2014)

Welcome to our ninth edition of “This Month in the Ecosystem,” a digest of highlights from May/early June 2014 (never intended to be comprehensive; for that, see the excellent Hadoop Weekly).

More good news!

How-to: Configure JDBC Connections in Secure Apache Hadoop Environments

Learn how HiveServer, Apache Sentry, and Impala help make Hadoop play nicely with BI tools when Kerberos is involved.

In 2010, I wrote a simple pair of blog entries outlining the general considerations behind using Apache Hadoop with BI tools. The Cloudera partner ecosystem has positively exploded since then, and the technology has matured as well. Today, if JDBC is involved, all the pieces needed to expose Hadoop data through familiar BI tools are available:

Index-Level Security Comes to Cloudera Search

The integration of Apache Sentry with Apache Solr helps Cloudera Search meet important security requirements.

As you have learned in previous blog posts, Cloudera Search brings the power of Apache Hadoop to a wide variety of business users via the ease and flexibility of full-text querying provided by Apache Solr. We have also done significant work to make Cloudera Search easy to add to an existing Hadoop cluster:

How-to: Implement Role-based Security in Impala using Apache Sentry

This quick demo illustrates how easy it is to implement role-based access and control in Impala using Sentry.

Apache Sentry (incubating) is the Apache Hadoop ecosystem tool for role-based access control (RBAC). In this how-to, I will demonstrate how to implement Sentry for RBAC in Impala. I feel this introduction is best motivated by a use case.

How-to: Make Hadoop Accessible via LDAP

Integrating Hue with LDAP can help make your secure Hadoop apps as widely consumed as possible.

Hue, the open source Web UI that makes Apache Hadoop easier to use, easily integrates with your corporation’s existing identity management systems and provides authentication mechanisms for SSO providers. So, by changing a few configuration parameters, your employees can start analyzing Big Data in their own browsers under an existing security policy.

How-to: Get Started with Sentry in Hive

A quick on-ramp (and demo) for using the new Sentry module for RBAC in conjunction with Hive

One attribute of the Enterprise Data Hub is fine-grained access to data by users and apps. This post about supporting infrastructure for that goal was originally published at blogs.apache.org. We republish it here for your convenience.

Enabling SSO Authentication in Hue

There’s good news for users of Hue, the open source web UI that makes Apache Hadoop easier to use: A new SAML 2.0-compliant backend, which is scheduled to ship in the next release of the Cloudera platform, will provide a better authentication experience for users as well as IT.

With this new feature, single sign-on (SSO) authentication can be achieved instead of using Hue credentials – thus, user credentials can be managed centrally (a big benefit for IT), and users needn’t log in to Hue if they have already logged in to another Web application sharing the SSO (a big benefit for users).

With Sentry, Cloudera Fills Hadoop’s Enterprise Security Gap

Every day, more data, users, and applications are accessing ever-larger Apache Hadoop clusters. Although this is good news for data driven organizations overall, for security administrators and compliance officers, there are still lingering questions about how to enable end-users under existing Hadoop infrastructure without compromising security or compliance requirements.

While Hadoop has strong security at the filesystem level, it lacks the granular support needed to adequately secure access to data by users and BI applications. Today, this problem forces organizations in industries for which security is paramount (such as financial services, healthcare, and government) to make a choice: either leave data unprotected or lock out users entirely. Most of the time, the preferred choice is the latter, severely inhibiting access to data in Hadoop.

How HiveServer2 Brings Security and Concurrency to Apache Hive

Apache Hive was one of the first projects to bring higher-level languages to Apache Hadoop. Specifically, Hive enables the legions of trained SQL users to use industry-standard SQL to process their Hadoop data.

However, as you probably have gathered from all the recent community activity in the SQL-over-Hadoop area, Hive has a few limitations for users in the enterprise space. Until recently, two in particular – concurrency and security – were largely unaddressed.

Cloudera Search over Apache HBase: A Story of Collaboration

Thanks to Steven Noels, SVP of Products for NGDATA, for the guest post below.

NGDATA builds and sells Lily, the next-generation Customer Intelligence Platform that helps enterprise marketing teams collect and store customer interaction data in order to profile, segment, and present better offers. We designed Lily from the ground up to run on Apache HBase and Apache Solr. Combining these technologies with our deep marketing segmentation expertise and unique machine learning techniques we’re able to deliver interactive data management, real-time statistical calculations, faceted search views of customers, offers, interactions and the permutations they each inspire.

How Apache Hadoop Helps Scan the Internet for Security Risks

The following guest post comes from Alejandro Caceres, president and CTO of Hyperion Gray LLC – a small research and development shop focusing on open-source software for cyber security.

Imagine this: You’re an informed citizen, active in local politics, and you decide you want to support your favorite local political candidate. You go to his or her new website and make a donation, providing your bank account information, name, address, and telephone number. Later, you find out that the website was hacked and your bank account and personal information stolen. You’re angry that your information wasn’t better protected — but at whom should your anger be directed?

How-to: Set Up a Hadoop Cluster with Network Encryption

Hadoop network encryption is a feature introduced in Apache Hadoop 2.0.2-alpha and in CDH4.1.

In this blog post, we’ll first cover Hadoop’s pre-existing security capabilities. Then, we’ll explain why network encryption may be required. We’ll also provide some details on how it has been implemented. At the end of this blog post, you’ll get step-by-step instructions to help you set up a Hadoop cluster with network encryption.

A Bit of History on Hadoop Security

How-to: Enable User Authentication and Authorization in Apache HBase

With the default Apache HBase configuration, everyone is allowed to read from and write to all tables available in the system. For many enterprise setups, this kind of policy is unacceptable. 

Administrators can set up firewalls that decide which machines are allowed to communicate with HBase. However, machines that can pass the firewall are still allowed to read from and write to all tables.  This kind of mechanism is effective but insufficient because HBase still cannot differentiate between multiple users that use the same client machines, and there is still no granularity with regard to HBase table, column family, or column qualifier access.

Authorization and Authentication In Hadoop

One of the more confusing topics in Hadoop is how authorization and authentication work in the system. The first and most important thing to recognize is the subtle, yet extremely important, differentiation between authorization and authentication, so let’s define these terms first:

Authentication is the process of determining whether someone is who they claim to be.

Introducing Alfredo, Kerberos HTTP SPNEGO for Java

What is Kerberos & SPNEGO?

Kerberos is an authentication protocol that provides mutual authentication and single sign-on capabilities.

Configuring Security Features in CDH3

Post written by Cloudera Software Engineer Aaron T. Myers.

Apache Hadoop has had methods of doing user authorization for some time. The Hadoop Distributed File System (HDFS) has a permissions model similar to Unix to control file and directory access, and MapReduce has access control lists (ACLs) per job queue to control which users may submit jobs. These authorization schemes allow Hadoop users and administrators to specify exactly who may access Hadoop’s resources. However, until recently, these mechanisms relied on a fundamentally insecure method of identifying the user who is interacting with Hadoop. That is, Hadoop had no way of performing reliable authentication. This limitation meant that any authorization system built on top of Hadoop, while helpful to prevent accidental unwanted access, could do nothing to prevent malicious users from accessing other users’ data.

Hadoop World: Security and API Compatibility

Today’s Hadoop World talk comes from Owen O’Malley and talks about some of the biggest challenges facing Hadoop: Security and API Compatibility.

Over the past several months, Yahoo! has been leading the charge in both areas. This work will enable wider use of Hadoop within Yahoo! as well as lower the barrier for new users – particularly those working with sensitive data. A big thanks to Yahoo! and everyone else in the community helping out.