Cloudera Engineering Blog · Project Rhino Posts

New in CDH 5.3: Transparent Encryption in HDFS

Support for transparent, end-to-end encryption in HDFS is now available and production-ready (and shipping inside CDH 5.3 and later). Here’s how it works.

Apache Hadoop 2.6 adds support for transparent encryption to HDFS. Once configured, data read from and written to specified HDFS directories will be transparently encrypted and decrypted, without requiring any changes to user application code. This encryption is also end-to-end, meaning that data can only be encrypted and decrypted by the client. HDFS itself never handles unencrypted data or data encryption keys. All these characteristics improve security, and HDFS encryption can be an important part of an organization-wide data protection story.

Cloudera Enterprise 5.3 is Released

We’re pleased to announce the release of Cloudera Enterprise 5.3 (comprising CDH 5.3, Cloudera Manager 5.3, and Cloudera Navigator 2.2).

This release continues the drumbeat for security functionality in particular, with HDFS encryption (jointly developed with Intel under Project Rhino) now recommended for production use. This feature alone should justify upgrades for security-minded users (and an improved CDH upgrade wizard makes that process easier).

The Early Release Books Keep Coming: This Time, Hadoop Security

Hadoop Security is the latest book from Cloudera engineers in the Hadoop ecosystem books canon.

We are thrilled to announce the availability of the early release of Hadoop Security, a new book about security in the Apache Hadoop ecosystem published by O’Reilly Media. The early release contains two chapters on System Architecture and Securing Data Ingest and is available in O’Reilly’s catalog and in Safari Books.

Meet the Engineer: Sravya Tirukkovalur

Meet Sravya Tirukkovalur (@sravsatuluri), a Software Engineer working on Apache Hadoop security at Cloudera.

What do you do at Cloudera, and in which Apache projects are you involved?

Why Extended Attributes are Coming to HDFS

Extended attributes in HDFS will facilitate at-rest encryption for Project Rhino, but they have many other uses, too.

Many mainstream Linux filesystems implement extended attributes, which let you associate metadata with a file or directory beyond common “fixed” attributes like filesize, permissions, modification dates, and so on. Extended attributes are key/value pairs in which the values are optional; generally, the key and value sizes are limited to some implementation-specific limit. A filesystem that implements extended attributes also provides system calls and shell commands to get, list, set, and remove attributes (and values) to/from a file or directory.