Cloudera Developer Blog · Kite SDK Posts

How-to: Process Data using Morphlines (in Kite SDK)

Our thanks to Janos Matyas, CTO and Founder of SequenceIQ, for the guest post below about his company’s use case for Morphlines (part of the Kite SDK).

SequenceIQ has an Apache Hadoop-based platform and API that consume and ingest various types of data from different sources to offer predictive analytics and actionable insights. Our datasets are structured, unstructured, log files, and communication records, and they require constant refining, cleaning, and transformation.

Cloudera Development Kit is Now "Kite SDK"

CDK has a new monicker, but the goals remain the same.

We are pleased to announce a new name for the Cloudera Development Kit (CDK): Kite. We’ve just released Kite version 0.10.0, which is purely a rename of CDK 0.9.0.

Email Indexing Using Cloudera Search and HBase

In my previous post you learned how to index email messages in batch mode, and in near real time, using Apache Flume with MorphlineSolrSink. In this post, you will learn how to index emails using Cloudera Search with Apache HBase and Lily HBase Indexer, maintained by NGDATA and Cloudera. (If you have not read the previous post, I recommend you do so for background before reading on.)

Which near-real-time method to choose, HBase Indexer or Flume MorphlineSolrSink, will depend entirely on your use case, but below are some things to consider when making that decision:

Cascading, Spring, and Spark: Development Choices for CDH Users Expand

In software development, there is no substitute for having choices. Furthermore, freedom of choice – between frameworks, APIs, and languages — is a major fuel source for platform adoption across any successful ecosystem.

In the case of development on CDH, the open source core of Cloudera’s Big Data platform containing Apache Hadoop and related ecosystem projects, the choices have expanded dramatically in the past three weeks:

Collection Aliasing: Near Real-Time Search for Really Big Data

The rise of Big Data has been pushing search engines to handle ever-increasing amounts of data. While building Cloudera Search, one of the things we considered in Cloudera Engineering was how we would incorporate Apache Solr with Apache Hadoop in a way that would enable near-real-time indexing and searching on really big data.

Eventually, we built Cloudera Search on Solr and Apache Lucene, both of which have been adding features at an ever-faster pace to aid in handling more and more data. However, there is no silver bullet for dealing with extremely large-scale data. A common answer in the world of search is “it depends,” and that answer applies in large-scale search as well. The right architecture for your use case depends on many things, and your choice will generally be guided by the requirements and resources for your particular project.

Email Indexing Using Cloudera Search

Why would any company be interested in searching through its vast trove of email? A better question is: Why wouldn’t everybody be interested? 

Email has become the most widespread method of communication we have, so there is much value to be extracted by making all emails searchable and readily available for further analysis. Some common use cases that involve email analysis are fraud detection, customer sentiment and churn, lawsuit prevention, and that’s just the tip of the iceberg. Each and every company can extract tremendous value based on its own business needs. 

Next Stops for The Cloudera Sessions: Jersey City, Miami, Denver, Milwaukee

Cloudera Sessions

In its first leg of its tour of the United States earlier this year (see photos here), The Cloudera Sessions proved to be an invaluable single-day event for business and technical leaders exploring practical applications of Apache Hadoop. So valuable, in fact, that we’ve extended the tour with dates/cities this September and October.

This Month in the Ecosystem

The ecosystem is evolving at a rapid pace – so rapidly, that important developments are often passing through the public attention zone too quickly. Thus, we think it might be helpful to bring you a digest (by no means complete!) of our favorite highlights on a regular basis. (This effort, by the way, has different goals than the fine Hadoop Weekly newsletter, which has a more expansive view – and which you should subscribe to immediately, as far as we’re concerned.)

Find the first installment below. Although the time period reflected here is obviously more than a month long, we have some catching up to do before we can move to a truly monthly cadence.

Introducing Morphlines: The Easy Way to Build and Integrate ETL Apps for Hadoop

This post is the first in a series of blog posts about Cloudera Morphlines, a new command-based framework that simplifies data preparation for Apache Hadoop workloads. To check it out or help contribute, you can find the code here.

Cloudera Morphlines is a new open source framework that reduces the time and effort necessary to integrate, build, and change Hadoop processing applications that extract, transform, and load data into Apache Solr, Apache HBase, HDFS, enterprise data warehouses, or analytic online dashboards. If you want to integrate, build, or facilitate transformation pipelines without programming and without substantial MapReduce skills, and get the job done with a minimum amount of fuss and support costs, this post gets you started.

What’s Next for HBase? Big Data Applications Using Frameworks Like Kiji

Michael Stack is the chair of the Apache HBase PMC and has been a committer and project “caretaker” since 2007. Stack is a Software Engineer at Cloudera.

Apache Hadoop and HBase have quickly become industry standards for storage and analysis of Big Data in the enterprise, yet as adoption spreads, new challenges and opportunities have emerged. Today, there is a large gap — a chasm, a gorge — between the nice application model your Big Data Application builder designed and the raw, byte-based APIs provided by HBase and Hadoop. Many Big Data players have invested a lot of time and energy in bridging this gap. Cloudera, where I work, is developing the Cloudera Development Kit (CDK). Kiji, an open source framework for building Big Data Applications, is another such thriving option. A lot of thought has gone into its design. More importantly, long experience building Big Data Applications on top of Hadoop and HBase has been baked into how it all works.

Kiji provides a model and set of libraries that help you get up and running quickly.

Older Posts