Cloudera Developer Blog · HDFS Posts

A Guide to Checkpointing in Hadoop

Understanding how checkpointing works in HDFS can make the difference between a healthy cluster or a failing one.

Checkpointing is an essential part of maintaining and persisting filesystem metadata in HDFS. It’s crucial for efficient NameNode recovery and restart, and is an important indicator of overall cluster health. However, checkpointing can also be a source of confusion for operators of Apache Hadoop clusters.

Apache Hadoop 2.3.0 is Released (HDFS Caching FTW!)

Hadoop 2.3.0 includes hundreds of new fixes and features, but none more important than HDFS caching.

The Apache Hadoop community has voted to release Hadoop 2.3.0, which includes (among many other things):

Apache Hadoop 2 is Here and Will Transform the Ecosystem

The release of Apache Hadoop 2, as announced today by the Apache Software Foundation, is an exciting one for the entire Hadoop ecosystem.

Cloudera engineers have been working hard for many months with the rest of the vast Hadoop community to ensure that Hadoop 2 is the best it can possibly be, for the users of Cloudera’s platform as well as all Hadoop users generally. Hadoop 2 contains many major advances, including (but not limited to):

How Improved Short-Circuit Local Reads Bring Better Performance and Security to Hadoop

One of the key principles behind Apache Hadoop is the idea that moving computation is cheaper than moving data — we prefer to move the computation to the data whenever possible, rather than the other way around. Because of this, the Hadoop Distributed File System (HDFS) typically handles many “local reads” reads where the reader is on the same node as the data:

Demo: HDFS File Operations Made Easy with Hue

Managing and viewing data in HDFS is an important part of Big Data analytics. Hue, the open source web-based interface that makes Apache Hadoop easier to use, helps you do that through a GUI in your browser —  instead of logging into a Hadoop gateway host with a terminal program and using the command line.

The first episode in a new series of Hue demos, the video below demonstrates how to get up and running quickly with HDFS file operations via Hue’s File Browser application.

Apache Hadoop 2.0.3-alpha Released

Last week the Apache Hadoop PMC voted to release Apache Hadoop 2.0.3-alpha, the latest in the Hadoop 2 release series. This release fixes over 500 issues (covering the Common, HDFS, MapReduce and YARN sub-projects) since the 2.0.2-alpha release in October last year. In addition to bug fixes and general improvements the more noteworthy changes include:

Apache Hadoop in 2013: The State of the Platform

For several good reasons, 2013 is a Happy New Year for Apache Hadoop enthusiasts.

In 2012, we saw continued progress on developing the next generation of the MapReduce processing framework (MRv2), work that will bear fruit this year. HDFS experienced major progress toward becoming a lights-out, fully enterprise-ready distributed filesystem with the addition of high availability features and increased performance. And a hint of the future of the Hadoop platform was provided with the Beta release of Cloudera Impala, a real-time query engine for analytics across HDFS and Apache HBase data.

Secrets of Cloudera Support: The Champagne Strategy

At Cloudera, we put great pride into drinking our own champagne. That pride extends to our support team, in particular.

Cloudera Manager, our end-to-end management platform for CDH (Cloudera’s open-source, enterprise-ready distribution of Apache Hadoop and related projects), has a feature that allows subscription customers to send a snapshot of their cluster to us. When these cluster snapshots come to us from customers, they end up in a CDH cluster at Cloudera where various forms of data processing and aggregation can be performed. 

Quorum-based Journaling in CDH4.1

A few weeks back, Cloudera announced CDH 4.1, the latest update release to Cloudera’s Distribution including Apache Hadoop. This is the first release to introduce truly standalone High Availability for the HDFS NameNode, with no dependence on special hardware or external software. This post explains the inner workings of this new feature from a developer’s standpoint. If, instead, you are seeking information on configuring and operating this feature, please refer to the CDH4 High Availability Guide.

Background

Since the beginning of the project, HDFS has been designed around a very simple architecture: a master daemon, called the NameNode, stores filesystem metadata, while slave daemons, called DataNodes, store the filesystem data. The NameNode is highly reliable and efficient, and the simple architecture is what has allowed HDFS to reliably store petabytes of production-critical data in thousands of clusters for many years; however, for quite some time, the NameNode was also a single point of failure (SPOF) for an HDFS cluster. Since the first beta release of CDH4 in February, this issue has been addressed by the introduction of a Standby NameNode, which provides automatic hot failover capability to a backup. For a detailed discussion of the design of the HA NameNode, please refer to the earlier post by my colleague Aaron Myers.

Limitations of NameNode HA in Previous Versions

CDH4.1 Now Released!

Update time!  As a reminder, Cloudera releases major versions of CDH, our 100% open source distribution of Apache Hadoop and related projects, annually and then updates to CDH every three months.  Updates primarily comprise bug fixes but we will also add enhancements.  We only include fixes or enhancements in updates that maintain compatibility, improve system stability and still allow customers and users to skip updates as they see fit.

We’re pleased to announce the availability of CDH4.1.  We’ve seen excellent adoption of CDH4.0 since it went GA at the end of June and a number of exciting use cases have moved to production.  CDH4.1 is an update that has a number of fixes but also a number of useful enhancements.  Among them:

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