Cloudera Developer Blog · HDFS Posts

Why Extended Attributes are Coming to HDFS

Extended attributes in HDFS will facilitate at-rest encryption for Project Rhino, but they have many other uses, too.

Many mainstream Linux filesystems implement extended attributes, which let you associate metadata with a file or directory beyond common “fixed” attributes like filesize, permissions, modification dates, and so on. Extended attributes are key/value pairs in which the values are optional; generally, the key and value sizes are limited to some implementation-specific limit. A filesystem that implements extended attributes also provides system calls and shell commands to get, list, set, and remove attributes (and values) to/from a file or directory.

Project Rhino Goal: At-Rest Encryption for Apache Hadoop

An update on community efforts to bring at-rest encryption to HDFS — a major theme of Project Rhino.

Encryption is a key requirement for many privacy and security-sensitive industries, including healthcare (HIPAA regulations), card payments (PCI DSS regulations), and the US government (FISMA regulations).

How-to: Use Kite SDK to Easily Store and Configure Data in Apache Hadoop

Organizing your data inside Hadoop doesn’t have to be hard — Kite SDK helps you try out new data configurations quickly in either HDFS or HBase.

Kite SDK is a Cloudera-sponsored open source project that makes it easier for you to build applications on top of Apache Hadoop. Its premise is that you shouldn’t need to know how Hadoop works to build your application on it, even though that’s an unfortunately common requirement today (because the Hadoop APIs are low-level; all you get is a filesystem and whatever else you can dream up — well, code up).

A Guide to Checkpointing in Hadoop

Understanding how checkpointing works in HDFS can make the difference between a healthy cluster or a failing one.

Checkpointing is an essential part of maintaining and persisting filesystem metadata in HDFS. It’s crucial for efficient NameNode recovery and restart, and is an important indicator of overall cluster health. However, checkpointing can also be a source of confusion for operators of Apache Hadoop clusters.

Apache Hadoop 2.3.0 is Released (HDFS Caching FTW!)

Hadoop 2.3.0 includes hundreds of new fixes and features, but none more important than HDFS caching.

The Apache Hadoop community has voted to release Hadoop 2.3.0, which includes (among many other things):

Apache Hadoop 2 is Here and Will Transform the Ecosystem

The release of Apache Hadoop 2, as announced today by the Apache Software Foundation, is an exciting one for the entire Hadoop ecosystem.

Cloudera engineers have been working hard for many months with the rest of the vast Hadoop community to ensure that Hadoop 2 is the best it can possibly be, for the users of Cloudera’s platform as well as all Hadoop users generally. Hadoop 2 contains many major advances, including (but not limited to):

How Improved Short-Circuit Local Reads Bring Better Performance and Security to Hadoop

One of the key principles behind Apache Hadoop is the idea that moving computation is cheaper than moving data — we prefer to move the computation to the data whenever possible, rather than the other way around. Because of this, the Hadoop Distributed File System (HDFS) typically handles many “local reads” reads where the reader is on the same node as the data:

Demo: HDFS File Operations Made Easy with Hue

Managing and viewing data in HDFS is an important part of Big Data analytics. Hue, the open source web-based interface that makes Apache Hadoop easier to use, helps you do that through a GUI in your browser —  instead of logging into a Hadoop gateway host with a terminal program and using the command line.

The first episode in a new series of Hue demos, the video below demonstrates how to get up and running quickly with HDFS file operations via Hue’s File Browser application.

Apache Hadoop 2.0.3-alpha Released

Last week the Apache Hadoop PMC voted to release Apache Hadoop 2.0.3-alpha, the latest in the Hadoop 2 release series. This release fixes over 500 issues (covering the Common, HDFS, MapReduce and YARN sub-projects) since the 2.0.2-alpha release in October last year. In addition to bug fixes and general improvements the more noteworthy changes include:

Apache Hadoop in 2013: The State of the Platform

For several good reasons, 2013 is a Happy New Year for Apache Hadoop enthusiasts.

In 2012, we saw continued progress on developing the next generation of the MapReduce processing framework (MRv2), work that will bear fruit this year. HDFS experienced major progress toward becoming a lights-out, fully enterprise-ready distributed filesystem with the addition of high availability features and increased performance. And a hint of the future of the Hadoop platform was provided with the Beta release of Cloudera Impala, a real-time query engine for analytics across HDFS and Apache HBase data.

Older Posts