Cloudera Engineering Blog · Guest Posts

Graduating Apache Parquet

The following post from Julien Le Dem, a tech lead at Twitter, originally appeared in the Twitter Engineering Blog. We bring it to you here for your convenience.

ASF, the Apache Software Foundation, recently announced the graduation of Apache Parquet, a columnar storage format for the Apache Hadoop ecosystem. At Twitter, we’re excited to be a founding member of the project.

How-to: Get Started with CDH on OpenStack with Sahara

The recent OpenStack Kilo release adds many features to the Sahara project, which provides a simple means of provisioning an Apache Hadoop (or Spark) cluster on top of OpenStack. This how-to, from Intel Software Engineer Wei Ting Chen, explains how to use the Sahara CDH plugin with this new release.

Prerequisites

This how-to assumes that OpenStack is already installed. If not, we recommend using Devstack to build a test OpenStack environment in a short time. (Note: Devstack is not recommended for use in a production environment. For production deployments, refer to the OpenStack Installation Guide.)

Sahara UI

Scan Improvements in Apache HBase 1.1.0

The following post, from Cloudera intern Jonathan Lawlor, originally appeared in the Apache Software Foundation’s blog.

Over the past few months there have a been a variety of nice changes made to scanners in Apache HBase. This post focuses on two such changes, namely RPC chunking (HBASE-11544) and scanner heartbeat messages (HBASE-13090). Both of these changes address long standing issues in the client-server scan protocol. Specifically, RPC chunking deals with how a server handles the scanning of very large rows and scanner heartbeat messages allow scan operations to progress even when aggressive server-side filtering makes infrequent result returns.

Background

Working with Apache Spark: Or, How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Shuffle

Our thanks to Ilya Ganelin, Senior Data Engineer at Capital One Labs, for the guest post below about his hard-earned lessons from using Spark.

I started using Apache Spark in late 2014, learning it at the same time as I learned Scala, so I had to wrap my head around the various complexities of a new language as well as a new computational framework. This process was a great in-depth introduction to the world of Big Data (I previously worked as an electrical engineer for Boeing), and I very quickly found myself deep in the guts of Spark. The hands-on experience paid off; I now feel extremely comfortable with Spark as my go-to tool for a wide variety of data analytics tasks, but my journey here was no cakewalk.

Text Mining with Impala

Thanks to Torsten Kilias and Alexander Löser of the Beuth University of Applied Sciences in Berlin for the following guest post about their INDREX project and its integration with Impala for integrated management of textual and relational data.

Textual data is a core source of information in the enterprise. Example demands arise from sales departments (monitor and identify leads), human resources (identify professionals with capabilities in ‘xyz’), market research (campaign monitoring from the social web), product development (incorporate feedback from customers), and the medical domain (anamnesis).

Using Apache Parquet at AppNexus

Thanks to Chen Song, Data Team Lead at AppNexus, for allowing us to republish the following post about his company’s use case for Apache Parquet (incubating at this writing), the open standard for columnar storage across the Apache Hadoop ecosystem.

At AppNexus, over 2MM log events are ingested into our data pipeline every second. Log records are sent from upstream systems in the form of Protobuf messages. Raw logs are compressed in Snappy when stored on HDFS. That said, even with compression, this still leads to over 25TB of log data collected every day. On top of logs, we also have hundreds of MapReduce jobs that process and generate aggregated data. Collectively, we store petabytes of data in our primary Hadoop cluster.

How Edmunds.com Used Spark Streaming to Build a Near Real-Time Dashboard

Thanks to Sam Shuster, Software Engineer at Edmunds.com, for the guest post below about his company’s use case for Spark Streaming, SparkOnHBase, and Morphlines.

Every year, the Super Bowl brings parties, food and hopefully a great game to appease everyone’s football appetites until the fall. With any event that brings in around 114 million viewers with larger numbers each year, Americans have also grown accustomed to commercials with production budgets on par with television shows and with entertainment value that tries to rival even the game itself.

Converting Apache Avro Data to Parquet Format in Apache Hadoop

Thanks to Big Data Solutions Architect Matthieu Lieber for allowing us to republish the post below.

A customer of mine wants to take advantage of both worlds: work with his existing Apache Avro data, with all of the advantages that it confers, but take advantage of the predicate push-down features that Parquet provides. How to reconcile the two?

Exactly-once Spark Streaming from Apache Kafka

Thanks to Cody Koeninger, Senior Software Engineer at Kixer, for the guest post below about Apache Kafka integration points in Apache Spark 1.3. Spark 1.3 will ship in CDH 5.4.

The new release of Apache Spark, 1.3, includes new experimental RDD and DStream implementations for reading data from Apache Kafka. As the primary author of those features, I’d like to explain their implementation and usage. You may be interested if you would benefit from:

Calculating CVA with Apache Spark

Thanks to Matthew Dixon, principal consultant at Quiota LLC and Professor of Analytics at the University of San Francisco, and Mohammad Zubair, Professor of Computer Science at Old Dominion University, for this guest post that demonstrates how to easily deploy exposure calculations on Apache Spark for in-memory analytics on scenario data.

Since the 2007 global financial crisis, financial institutions now more accurately measure the risks of over-the-counter (OTC) products. It is now standard practice for institutions to adjust derivative prices for the risk of the counter-party’s, or one’s own, default by means of credit or debit valuation adjustments (CVA/DVA).

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