Cloudera Engineering Blog · Avro Posts

Meet the Project Founder: Doug Cutting (First in a Series)

ToddAt Cloudera, there is a long and proud tradition of employees creating new open source projects intended to help fill gaps in platform functionality (in addition to hiring new employees who have done so in the past). In fact, more than a dozen ecosystem projects — including Apache Hadoop itself — were founded by Clouderans, more than can be attributed to employees of any other single company. Cloudera was also the first vendor to ship most of those projects as enterprise-ready bits inside its platform.

We thought you might be interested in meeting some of them over the next few months, in a new “Meet the Project Founder” series. It’s only appropriate that we begin with Doug Cutting himself – Cloudera’s chief architect and the quadruple-threat founder of Apache Lucene, Apache Nutch, Apache Hadoop, and Apache Avro.

Apache Hadoop in 2013: The State of the Platform

For several good reasons, 2013 is a Happy New Year for Apache Hadoop enthusiasts.

In 2012, we saw continued progress on developing the next generation of the MapReduce processing framework (MRv2), work that will bear fruit this year. HDFS experienced major progress toward becoming a lights-out, fully enterprise-ready distributed filesystem with the addition of high availability features and increased performance. And a hint of the future of the Hadoop platform was provided with the Beta release of Cloudera Impala, a real-time query engine for analytics across HDFS and Apache HBase data.

What’s Next for Cloudera Impala?

It’s been an exciting month and a half since the launch of the Cloudera Impala (the new open source distributed query engine for Apache Hadoop) beta, and we thought it’d be a great time to provide an update about what’s next for the project – including our product roadmap, release schedule and open-source plan.

First of all, we’d like to thank you for your enthusiasm and valuable beta feedback. We’re actively listening and have already fixed many of the bugs reported, captured feature requests for the roadmap, and updated the Cloudera Impala FAQ based on user input.

GA Roadmap

CDH3 update 5 is now available

We are happy to announce the general availability of CDH3 update 5. This update is a maintenance release of CDH3 platform and provides a considerable amount of bug-fixes and stability enhancements. Alongside these fixes, we have also included a few new features, most notable of which are the following:

Apache Flume Development Status Update

Apache Flume is a scalable, reliable, fault-tolerant, distributed system designed to collect, transfer, and store massive amounts of event data into HDFS. Apache Flume recently graduated from the Apache Incubator as a Top Level Project at Apache. Flume is designed to send data over multiple hops from the initial source(s) to the final destination(s). Click here for details of the basic architecture of Flume. In this article, we will discuss in detail some new components in Flume 1.x (also known as Flume NG), which is currently on the trunk branch, techniques and components that can be be used to route the data, configuration validation, and finally support for serializing events.

In the past several months, contributors have been busy adding several new sources, sinks and channels to Flume. Flume now supports Syslog as a source, where sources have been added to support Syslog over TCP and UDP.

Apache Avro at RichRelevance

This is a guest post from RichRelevance Principal Architect and Apache Avro PMC Chair Scott Carey.

In Early 2010 at RichRelevance, we were searching for a new way to store our long lived data that was compact, efficient, and maintainable over time. We had been using Hadoop for about a year, and started with the basics – text formats and SequenceFiles. Neither of these were sufficient. Text formats are not compact enough, and can be painful to maintain over time. A basic binary format may be more compact, but it has the same maintenance issues as text. Furthermore, we needed rich data types including lists and nested records.

Apache Flume – Architecture of Flume NG

This blog was originally posted on the Apache Blog: https://blogs.apache.org/flume/entry/flume_ng_architecture

Apache Flume is a distributed, reliable, and available system for efficiently collecting, aggregating and moving large amounts of log data from many different sources to a centralized data store. Flume is currently undergoing incubation at The Apache Software Foundation. More information on this project can be found at http://incubator.apache.org/flume. Flume NG is work related to new major revision of Flume and is the subject of this post.

Hadoop World 2011: A Glimpse into Development

The Development track at Hadoop World is a technical deep dive dedicated to discussion about Apache Hadoop and application development for Apache Hadoop. You will hear committers, contributors and expert users from various Hadoop projects discuss the finer points of building applications with Hadoop and the related ecosystem. The sessions will touch on foundational topics such as HDFS, HBase, Pig, Hive, Flume and other related technologies. In addition, speakers will address key development areas including tools, performance, bringing the stack together and testing the stack. Sessions in this track are for developers of all levels who want to learn more about upcoming features and enhancements, new tools, advanced techniques and best practices.

Preview of Development Track Sessions

Introducing Crunch: Easy MapReduce Pipelines for Apache Hadoop

As a data scientist at Cloudera, I work with customers across a wide range of industries that use Apache Hadoop to solve their business problems. Many of the solutions we create involve multi-stage pipelines of MapReduce jobs that join, clean, aggregate, and analyze enormous amounts of data. When working with log files or relational database tables, we use high-level tools like Apache Pig and Apache Hive for their convenient and powerful support for creating pipelines over structured and semi-structured records.

As Hadoop has spread from web companies to other industries, the variety of data that is stored in HDFS has expanded dramatically. Hadoop clusters are being used to process satellite images, time series data, audio files, and seismograms. These formats are not a natural fit for the data schemas imposed by Pig and Hive, in the same way that structured binary data in a relational database can be a bit awkward to work with. For these use cases, we either end up writing large, custom libraries of user-defined functions in Pig or Hive, or simply give up on our high-level tools and go back to writing MapReduces in Java. Either of these options is a serious drain on developer productivity.

Apache Sqoop – Overview

This blog was originally posted on the Apache Blog: https://blogs.apache.org/sqoop/entry/apache_sqoop_overview

Using Hadoop for analytics and data processing requires loading data into clusters and processing it in conjunction with other data that often resides in production databases across the enterprise. Loading bulk data into Hadoop from production systems or accessing it from map reduce applications running on large clusters can be a challenging task. Users must consider details like ensuring consistency of data, the consumption of production system resources, data preparation for provisioning downstream pipeline. Transferring data using scripts is inefficient and time consuming. Directly accessing data residing on external systems from within the map reduce applications complicates applications and exposes the production system to the risk of excessive load originating from cluster nodes.

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