Cloudera Engineering Blog

Big Data best practices, how-to's, and internals from Cloudera Engineering and the community


Project Rhino Goal: At-Rest Encryption for Apache Hadoop

An update on community efforts to bring at-rest encryption to HDFS — a major theme of Project Rhino.

Encryption is a key requirement for many privacy and security-sensitive industries, including healthcare (HIPAA regulations), card payments (PCI DSS regulations), and the US government (FISMA regulations).

How-to: Easily Do Rolling Upgrades with Cloudera Manager

Unique across all options, Cloudera Manager makes it easy to do what would otherwise be a disruptive operation for operators and users.

For the increasing number of customers that rely on enterprise data hubs (EDHs) for business-critical applications, it is imperative to minimize or eliminate downtime — thus, Cloudera has focused intently on making software upgrades a routine, non-disruptive operation for EDH administrators and users.

This Month in the Ecosystem (May 2014)

Welcome to our ninth edition of “This Month in the Ecosystem,” a digest of highlights from May/early June 2014 (never intended to be comprehensive; for that, see the excellent Hadoop Weekly).

More good news!

Capacity Planning with Big Data and Cloudera Manager

Thanks to Bill Podell, VP Big Data and BI Practice, MBI Solutions, for the guest post below.

Capacity planning has long been a critical component of successful implementations for production systems. Today, Big Data calls for a particularly deep understanding of capacity management – because resource utilization explodes as business users, analysts, and data scientists jump onboard to analyze and use newly found data. The resource impact can escalate very quickly, causing poor loading and or response times. The result is throwing more hardware at the issue without any understanding of what impact the new hardware will have on the current issue. Better yet, be proactive and know about the problem before the problem even occurs!

How-to: Use Kite SDK to Easily Store and Configure Data in Apache Hadoop

Organizing your data inside Hadoop doesn’t have to be hard — Kite SDK helps you try out new data configurations quickly in either HDFS or HBase.

Kite SDK is a Cloudera-sponsored open source project that makes it easier for you to build applications on top of Apache Hadoop. Its premise is that you shouldn’t need to know how Hadoop works to build your application on it, even though that’s an unfortunately common requirement today (because the Hadoop APIs are low-level; all you get is a filesystem and whatever else you can dream up — well, code up).

Apache Spark 1.0 is Released

Spark 1.0 is its biggest release yet, with a list of new features for enterprise customers.

Congratulations to the Apache Spark community for today’s release of Spark 1.0, which includes contributions from more than 100 people (including Cloudera’s own Diana Carroll, Mark Grover, Ted Malaska, Sean Owen, Sandy Ryza, and Marcelo Vanzin). We think this release is an important milestone in the continuing rapid uptake of Spark by enterprises — which is supported by Cloudera via Cloudera Enterprise 5 — as a modern, general-purpose processing engine for Apache Hadoop.

Apache Spark Resource Management and YARN App Models

A concise look at the differences between how Spark and MapReduce manage cluster resources under YARN

The most popular Apache YARN application after MapReduce itself is Apache Spark. At Cloudera, we have worked hard to stabilize Spark-on-YARN (SPARK-1101), and CDH 5.0.0 added support for Spark on YARN clusters.

New SQL Choices in the Apache Hadoop Ecosystem: Why Impala Continues to Lead

Impala continues to demonstrate performance leadership compared to alternatives (by 950% or more), while providing greater query throughput and with a far smaller CPU footprint.

In our previous post from January 2014, we reported that Impala had achieved query performance over Apache Hadoop equivalent to that of an analytic DBMS over its own proprietary storage system. We believed this was an important milestone because Impala’s objective has been to support a high-quality BI experience on Hadoop data, not to produce a “faster Apache Hive.” An enterprise-quality BI experience requires low latency and high concurrency (among other things), so surpassing a well-known proprietary MPP DBMS in these areas was important evidence of progress.
 
In the past nine months, we’ve also all seen additional public validation that the original technical design for Hive, while effective for batch processing, was a dead-end for BI workloads. Recent examples have included the launch of Facebook’s Presto engine (Facebook was the inventor and world’s largest user of Hive), the emergence of Shark (Hive running on the Apache Spark DAG), and the “Stinger” initiative (Hive running on the Apache Tez [incubating] DAG).
 
Given the introduction of a number of new SQL-on-Hadoop implementations it seemed like a good time to do a roundup of the latest versions of each engine to see how they differ. We find that Impala maintains a significant performance advantage over the various other open source alternatives — ranging from 5x to 23x depending on the workload and the implementations that are compared. This advantage is due to some inherent design differences among the various systems, which we’ll explain below. Impala’s advantage is strongest for multi-user workloads, which arguably is the most relevant measure for users evaluating their options for BI use cases.

Configuration

Cluster

How-to: Manage Time-Dependent Multilayer Networks in Apache Hadoop

Using an appropriate network representation and the right tool set are the key factors in successfully merging structured and time-series data for analysis.

In Part 1 of this series, you took your first steps for using Apache Giraph, the highly scalable graph-processing system, alongside Apache Hadoop. In this installment, you’ll explore a general use case for analyzing time-dependent, Big Data graphs using data from multiple sources. You’ll learn how to generate random large graphs and small-world networks using Giraph – as well as play with several parameters to probe the limits of your cluster.

Congratulations to Parquet, Now an Apache Incubator Project

Yesterday, Parquet was accepted into the Apache Incubator. Congratulations to all the contributors to what will eventually become Apache Parquet!

In its relatively short lifetime (co-founded by Twitter and Cloudera in July 2013), Parquet has already become the de facto standard for columnar storage of Apache Hadoop data — with native support in Impala, Apache Hive, Apache Pig, Apache Spark, MapReduce, Apache Tajo, Apache Drill, Apache Crunch, and Cascading (and forthcoming in Presto and Shark). Parquet adoption is also broad-based, with employees of the following companies (partial list) actively contributing:

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