Cloudera Engineering Blog · Data Science Posts

How-to: Use Cascading Pattern with R and CDH

Our thanks to Concurrent Inc. for the how-to below about using Cascading Pattern with CDH. Cloudera recently tested CDH 4.4 with the Cascading Compatibility Test Suite verifying compatibility with Cascading 2.2.

Cascading Pattern is a machine-learning project within the Cascading development framework used to build enterprise data workflows. Cascading provides an abstraction layer on top of Apache Hadoop and other computing topologies that allows enterprises to leverage existing skills and resources to build data processing applications on Hadoop, without the need for specialized Hadoop skills.

How-to: Use MADlib Pre-built Analytic Functions with Impala

Thanks to Victor Bittorf, a visiting graduate computer science student at Stanford University, for the guest post below about how to use the new prebuilt analytic functions for Cloudera Impala.

Cloudera Impala is an exciting project that unlocks interactive queries and SQL analytics on big data. Over the past few months I have been working with the Impala team to extend Impala’s analytic capabilities. Today I am happy to announce the availability of pre-built mathematical and statistical algorithms for the Impala community under a free open-source license. These pre-built algorithms combine recent theoretical techniques for shared nothing parallelization for analytics and the new user-defined aggregations (UDA) framework in Impala 1.2 in order to achieve big data scalability. This initial release has support for logistic regression, support vector machines (SVMs), and linear regression.

Customer Spotlight: Persado Makes Marketing a Data Science

It’s common to hear people describe themselves as being “left-brained” or “right-brained” based on their tendency to be more logical and mathematically driven (left-brained), or, conversely, to be intuitive and creatively driven (right-brained). For example, people who prefer math over art are often considered left-brained. People who get a higher verbal score on their SATs than for math are often considered right-brained.

In general, language and creative writing are considered right-brained exercises. Many people also associate marketing and advertising as a right-brained function, whereas engineering is considered very left-brained.

Meet the Project Founder: Josh Wills

In this installment of “Meet the Project Founder,” we speak with Josh Wills (@josh_wills), Cloudera’s Senior Director of Data Science and founder of Apache Crunch and Cloudera ML.

What led you to your project idea(s)?
When I first started at Cloudera in 2011, I had a fairly vague job description, no real responsibilities, and wasn’t all that familiar with the Apache Hadoop stack, so I started working on various pet projects in order to learn more about the tools and the use cases in domains like healthcare and energy.

Get Hired as a Certified Data Scientist

To paraphrase Nate Silver: “There is lots of data coming. Who will speak for all this data?”

Nearly every day, I read new articles about how Big Data is “changing everything.” Data scientists are unlocking new approaches that help researchers find the cure for cancer, banks fight fraud, the police fight drug-related crimes, and fantasy sports leaguers fight each other.

Myrrix Joins Cloudera to Bring "Big Learning" to Hadoop

What a short, strange trip it’s been. Just a year ago, I founded Myrrix in London’s Silicon Roundabout to commercialize large-scale machine learning based on Apache Hadoop and Apache Mahout. It’s been a busy scramble, building software and proudly watching early customers get real, big data-sized machine learning into production.

And now another beginning: Myrrix has a new home in Cloudera. I’m excited to join as Director of Data Science in London, alongside Josh Wills. Some of the Myrrix technology will be coming along to benefit CDH and its customers too. There was no question that Cloudera is the right place to continue building out the vision that started as Myrrix, because Josh, Jeff Hammerbacher and the rest of the data science team here have the same vision. It’s an unusually perfect match. Cloudera has made an increasingly complex big-data ecosystem increasingly accessible (Hadoop, real-time queries, search), and we’re going to make “Big Learning” on Hadoop easy and accessible too.

What is Old is New Again

Data-savvy companies of all sizes can now accomplish many viable machine learning projects.

How the SAS and Cloudera Platforms Work Together

On Monday April 29, Cloudera announced a strategic alliance with SAS. As the industry leader in business analytics software, SAS brings a formidable toolset to bear on the problem of extracting business value from large volumes of data.

Over the past few months, Cloudera has been hard at work along with the SAS team to integrate a number of SAS products with Apache Hadoop, delivering the ability for our customers to use these tools in their interaction with data on the Cloudera platform. In this post, we will delve into the major mechanisms that are available for connecting SAS to CDH, Cloudera’s 100% open-source distribution including Hadoop.

SAS/ACCESS to Hadoop

Algorithms Every Data Scientist Should Know: Reservoir Sampling

Data scientists, that peculiar mix of software engineer and statistician, are notoriously difficult to interview. One approach that I’ve used over the years is to pose a problem that requires some mixture of algorithm design and probability theory in order to come up with an answer. Here’s an example of this type of question that has been popular in Silicon Valley for a number of years: 

Say you have a stream of items of large and unknown length that we can only iterate over once. Create an algorithm that randomly chooses an item from this stream such that each item is equally likely to be selected.

How-to: Analyze Twitter Data with Hue

Hue 2.2 , the open source web-based interface that makes Apache Hadoop easier to use, lets you interact with Hadoop services from within your browser without having to go to a command-line interface. It features different applications like an Apache Hive editor and Apache Oozie dashboard and workflow builder.

This post is based on our “Analyzing Twitter Data with Hadoop” sample app and details how the same results can be achieved through Hue in a simpler way. Moreover, all the code and examples of the previous series have been updated to the recent CDH4.2 release.

Collecting Data

One User’s Impala Experience at Data Hacking Day

The following guest post comes to you from Alan Gardner of remote database services and consulting company Pythian, who participated in Data Hacking Day (and was on the winning team!) at Cloudera’s offices in February.

Last Feb. 25, just prior to attending Strata, Alex Gorbachev (our CTO) and I had the chance to visit Cloudera’s Palo Alto offices for Data Hacking Day. The goal of the event was to produce something cool that leverages Cloudera Impala – the new open source, low-latency platform for querying data in Apache Hadoop.

Newer Posts Older Posts