Cloudera Engineering Blog · Cloudera Manager Posts

One Engineer’s Experience with Parcel

We’re very pleased to bring you this guest post from Verisign engineer Benoit Perroud, which is based on his personal experiences with the new “Parcel” binary distribution format in Cloudera Manager 4.5.

Among all the new features released with Cloudera Manager 4.5, Parcel is probably one of the most unnoticed – despite the fact it has the potential to become the administrator’s best friend.

Cloudera Manager 4.6: Now with Significantly More Free Features

Yesterday we announced the availability of Cloudera Manager 4.6. As part of this release, the Free Edition of Cloudera Manager (now a part of Cloudera Standard) has been enhanced significantly to include many features formerly only available with a subscription license:

Updates to Cloudera Manager 4.6

The news this morning focused on the launch of Cloudera Search, an exciting new capability for our platform that was much anticipated by our customers and engineers. Also released at the same time is a new release of Cloudera Manager (4.6).

Cloudera Manager 4.6 includes a number of enhancements as well as improvements in quality and usability. (A follow-on blog post will do a deep dive on the new features and functions.) Most notable in Cloudera Manager 4.6 is that the free version (included in Cloudera Standard) is greatly enhanced. Cloudera Standard now includes monitoring, health checks, events & alerts, log search, kerberos automation, and multi-cluster support.

With New Product Packaging, Adopting the Platform for Big Data is Even Easier

Today is a big day: Cloudera is not only urging our customers to “Unaccept the Status Quo” (the continued and accelerating spending on data warehousing, expensive data storage, and associated software licenses), but we also announced that Cloudera Search has entered public beta. Now anyone who knows how to do a Google search can query data stored in Cloudera’s Platform for Big Data.

In this post, however, I’d like to explain the new, simpler product naming/packaging structure that will make adopting and deploying Cloudera more straightforward.

Introducing Cloudera Standard

How-to: Easily Configure and Manage Clusters in Cloudera Manager 4.5

Helping users manage hundreds of configurations for the growing family of Apache Hadoop services has always been one of Cloudera Manager’s main goals. Prior to version 4.5, it was possible to set configurations at the service (e.g. hdfs), role type (e.g. all datanodes), or individual role level (e.g. the datanode on machine17). An individual role would inherit the configurations set at the service and role-type levels. Configurations made at the role level would override those from the role-type level. While this approach offers flexibility when configuring clusters, it was tedious to configure subsets of roles in the same way.

In Cloudera Manager 4.5, this issue is addressed with the introduction of role groups. For each role type, you can create role groups and assign configurations to them. The members of those groups then inherit those configurations. For example, in a cluster with heterogeneous hardware, a datanode role group can be created for each host type and the datanodes running on those hosts can be assigned to their corresponding role group. That makes it possible to tweak the configurations for all the datanodes running on the same hardware by modifying the configurations of one role group.

FAQ: Understanding the Parcel Binary Distribution Format

Have you ever wished you could upgrade to the latest CDH minor release with just a few mouse clicks, and even without taking any downtime on your cluster? Well, with Cloudera Manager 4.5 and its new “Parcel” feature, you can!

That release introduced many new features and capabilities related to parcels, and in this FAQ-oriented post, you will learn about most of them.

What are parcels?

How-to: Automate Your Hadoop Cluster from Java

One of the complexities of Apache Hadoop is the need to deploy clusters of servers, potentially on a regular basis. At Cloudera, which at any time maintains hundreds of test and development clusters in different configurations, this process presents a lot of operational headaches if not done in an automated fashion. In this post, I’ll describe an approach to cluster automation that works for us, as well as many of our customers and partners.

Taming Complexity

At Cloudera engineering, we have a big support matrix: We work on many versions of CDH (multiple release trains, plus things like rolling upgrade testing), and CDH works across a wide variety of OS distros (RHEL 5 & 6, Ubuntu Precise & Lucid, Debian Squeeze, and SLES 11), and complex configuration combinations — highly available HDFS or simple HDFS, Kerberized or non-secure, using YARN or MR1 as the execution framework, etc. Clearly, we need an easy way to spin-up a new cluster that has the desired setup, which we can subsequently use for integration, testing, customer support, demos, and so on.

Customer Spotlight: Nokia’s Big Data Ecosystem Connects Cloudera, Teradata, Oracle, and Others

As Cloudera’s keeper of customer stories, it’s dawned on me that others might benefit from the information I’ve spent the past year collecting: the many use cases and deployment patterns for Hadoop amongst our customer base.

This week I’d like to highlight Nokia, a global company that we’re all familiar with as a large mobile phone provider, and whose Senior Director of Analytics – Amy O’Connor – will be speaking at tomorrow’s Cloudera Sessions event in Boston.

Cloudera Academic Partnership Program: Creating Hadoop Lovers in Universities Worldwide

Today Cloudera announced a new Cloudera Academic Partnership program, in which participating universities worldwide get access to curriculum, training, certification, and software. 

As noted in the press release, the global demand for people with Apache Hadoop and data science skills is dwarfing all supply. We consider it an important mission to help accredited universities meet that demand, by equipping them with the content and training they need to educate students in the Hadoop arts.

How-to: Use Vagrant to Set Up a Virtual Hadoop Cluster (For CDH 4)

This guest post comes to us from David Greco, CTO of Eligotech. For a how-to on this subject for CDH 5, see this post.

Vagrant is a very nice tool for programmatically managing many virtual machines (VMs) on a single physical machine. It natively supports VirtualBox and also provides plugins for VMware Fusion and Amazon EC2, supporting the management of VMs in those environments as well.

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