Cloudera Engineering Blog · Cloudera Manager Posts

New E-Learning for Parcels

Cloudera’s new Parcels installation format has been released, and I’m excited to highlight just how useful (and mind-blowingly cool) it is to system administrators and anyone responsible for maintaining a CDH cluster.

If you haven’t read about or played with Parcels, they make components of the distribution significantly easier to manage, install, and upgrade. The new Parcel distribution format works with Cloudera Manager 4.5 and later. When you perform installations and upgrades using Parcels, you get access to new Cloudera Manager features such as:

How-to: Deploy Hadoop Clusters Automatically with Dell Crowbar and Cloudera Manager

The following guest post, from Mike Pittaro of Dell’s Cloud Software Solutions team, describes his team’s use of the Dell Crowbar tool in conjunction with the Cloudera Manager API to automate cluster provisioning. Thanks, Mike!

Deploying, managing, and operating Apache Hadoop clusters can be complex at all levels of the stack, from the hardware on up. To hide this complexity and reduce deployment time, since 2011, Dell has been using Dell Crowbar in conjunction with Cloudera Manager to deploy the Dell | Cloudera Solution for Apache Hadoop for joint customers.

It’s All About You: New Community Forums for Cloudera Customers and Users

This is a great day for technical end-users – developers, admins, analysts, and data scientists alike. Starting now, Cloudera complements its traditional mailing lists with a new, feature-rich community forums intended for users of Cloudera’s Platform for Big Data!  (Login using your existing credentials or click the link to register.)

Although mailing lists have long been a standard for user interaction, and will undoubtedly continue to be, they have flaws. For example, they lack structure or taxonomy, which makes consumption difficult. Search functionality is often less than stellar and users are unable to build reputations that span an appreciable period of time. For these reasons, although they’re easy to create and manage, mailing lists inherently limit access to knowledge and hence limit adoption.

How-to: Manage Heterogeneous Hardware for Apache Hadoop using Cloudera Manager

In a prior blog post, Omar explained two important concepts introduced in Cloudera Manager 4.5: Role Groups and Host Templates. In this post, I’ll demonstrate how to use role groups and host templates to easily expand an existing CDH cluster onto heterogeneous hardware. If you haven’t already looked at Omar’s post, I’d recommend doing so before reading this one, as I’ll assume you are familiar with role groups and host templates.

Although these instructions/screenshots are premised on Cloudera Manager 4.5, they are valid for subsequent releases as well.

Initial State and Goal

How Does Cloudera Manager Work?

At Cloudera, we believe that Cloudera Manager is the best way to install, configure, manage, and monitor your Apache Hadoop stack. Of course, most users prefer not to take our word for it — they want to know how Cloudera Manager works under the covers, first. 

In this post, I’ll explain some of its inner workings. 

The Vocabulary of Cloudera Manager

One Engineer’s Experience with Parcel

We’re very pleased to bring you this guest post from Verisign engineer Benoit Perroud, which is based on his personal experiences with the new “Parcel” binary distribution format in Cloudera Manager 4.5.

Among all the new features released with Cloudera Manager 4.5, Parcel is probably one of the most unnoticed – despite the fact it has the potential to become the administrator’s best friend.

Cloudera Manager 4.6: Now with Significantly More Free Features

Yesterday we announced the availability of Cloudera Manager 4.6. As part of this release, the Free Edition of Cloudera Manager (now a part of Cloudera Standard) has been enhanced significantly to include many features formerly only available with a subscription license:

Updates to Cloudera Manager 4.6

The news this morning focused on the launch of Cloudera Search, an exciting new capability for our platform that was much anticipated by our customers and engineers. Also released at the same time is a new release of Cloudera Manager (4.6).

Cloudera Manager 4.6 includes a number of enhancements as well as improvements in quality and usability. (A follow-on blog post will do a deep dive on the new features and functions.) Most notable in Cloudera Manager 4.6 is that the free version (included in Cloudera Standard) is greatly enhanced. Cloudera Standard now includes monitoring, health checks, events & alerts, log search, kerberos automation, and multi-cluster support.

With New Product Packaging, Adopting the Platform for Big Data is Even Easier

Today is a big day: Cloudera is not only urging our customers to “Unaccept the Status Quo” (the continued and accelerating spending on data warehousing, expensive data storage, and associated software licenses), but we also announced that Cloudera Search has entered public beta. Now anyone who knows how to do a Google search can query data stored in Cloudera’s Platform for Big Data.

In this post, however, I’d like to explain the new, simpler product naming/packaging structure that will make adopting and deploying Cloudera more straightforward.

Introducing Cloudera Standard

How-to: Easily Configure and Manage Clusters in Cloudera Manager 4.5

Helping users manage hundreds of configurations for the growing family of Apache Hadoop services has always been one of Cloudera Manager’s main goals. Prior to version 4.5, it was possible to set configurations at the service (e.g. hdfs), role type (e.g. all datanodes), or individual role level (e.g. the datanode on machine17). An individual role would inherit the configurations set at the service and role-type levels. Configurations made at the role level would override those from the role-type level. While this approach offers flexibility when configuring clusters, it was tedious to configure subsets of roles in the same way.

In Cloudera Manager 4.5, this issue is addressed with the introduction of role groups. For each role type, you can create role groups and assign configurations to them. The members of those groups then inherit those configurations. For example, in a cluster with heterogeneous hardware, a datanode role group can be created for each host type and the datanodes running on those hosts can be assigned to their corresponding role group. That makes it possible to tweak the configurations for all the datanodes running on the same hardware by modifying the configurations of one role group.

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